Value Yourself, Value Your Business!

Source: Pixabay
Source: Pixabay

I can’t believe how long it’s been since I posted here. I never imagined being this busy and caught up with trying to get other things done. But more on that later, right now I’d like to get to today’s topic!

I attended one of my networking meetings today. I’ve discussed the importance/necessity of networking groups in the past, so I’ll just reiterate briefly how they are VITAL in the world of solopreneurship. Being around people with similar goals and visions pays off immensely. I’ve been in this particular group for at least a year now and it’s consisted of the same group of people for the most part, so they’ve seen me from day one of hardly having an elevator pitch, Continue reading “Value Yourself, Value Your Business!”

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But it Looks Like You Don’t Even Care|5 Ways You’re Ruining Your Professional Image

Among the many hats I wear is that of a full-time career woman. Over the past 15+ years I’ve seen things and people come and go. This includes rights and wrongs as far as moving up the career ladder. Nothing too complicated, but little things that go a long way. People have come to me with questions regarding their advancement ad why they don’t move up as fast as they think they should. Well, there are always different factors and situations that will affect one’s career, but here are 5 solid ones I think will always stand the test of time.

Basic CMYK
Why would you do this to yourself?

Always complaining without presenting solutions. There’s nothing that irritates a boss or manager more than that one employee who complains about the company’s problems, but doesn’t present a solution of some sort. Not that your boss expects you to turn the company around by yourself, but many of them welcome suggestions that may help with current problems in the office. Don’t assume that your voice won’t be heard. Come up with a well thought out plan that can help with a current problem and present it at the appropriate time with your boss or during a staff meeting. You’ll be surprised at the end result.

Your physical appearance. This is one of the most common ways people ruin their professional image….their appearance. It’s quite horrifying what people chose to wear especially when they work in a highly professional environment that deals with plenty of customer service. You’re the initial representation of your company or department. It doesn’t make sense to wear:

– sloppy jeans

– tight jeans

– low cut blouses

– halter tops

– flip flops

These items damage your credibility and decrease your chances of being taken seriously. Do you have to come in wearing Armani suits five days a weak? Absolutely not. It doesn’t take an expensive wardrobe to be presentable everyday, especially if your office is business/casual. Some folks take this granted and become too comfortable with the “casual” part. Wearing a decent cut blouse and slacks will do the trick.

Here’s a useful link on office attire tips that won’t bust your budget: Perfect Your Professional Image at Work

Source: Pixabay photos
Source: Pixabay photos

Wearing your emotions for the world to see. There are many types of personalities in the average office environment. People come from different types of backgrounds and upbringings that may or may not mesh well in a professional environment. Additionally, some days at work are just awful and you’re ready for it to end already. While it’s normal to have such days and things don’t always go your way, it’s so important not to let your emotions control you and your reaction to the un-pleasantries of office life. Walking around with a frown or sitting at a staff meeting with your arms crossed and face turned up will get you absolutely nowhere. And don’t think your boss doesn’t notice because they don’t say anything.

In actuality, they do notice and make note of it.

It’s not a good look and it just shows you’re incapable of handling certain responsibilities, making management less likely to rely on you. Well if they can’t rely on you then your chances of getting that promotion are pretty much shot. It’s better to take a moment away from everyone and put your emotions in check. Whether it’s in a bathroom stall or venting to someone during lunch break, it’s better than walking around announcing to everyone how ticked off or disappointed you are about something. Keep it professional and make sure you do what’s expected of you…with a smile. It’s easier said than done, but it’s possible.

man-311326_1280Not giving your best. It’s funny how those who do the bare minimum of their responsibilities are always the ones looking for praise and accolades. All they did was their job (barely) and they didn’t even bother to go above and beyond. If you’re looking to stand out from everyone else, you have to give management numerous reasons to have confidence in you and what you deliver because at the end of the day, your work speaks for you. Doing the bare minimum and expecting rewards for just showing up to work won’t cut it. Paying attention to detail, reviewing your work before submitting and performing quality assurance are habits that will make you stand out in the crowd – especially if you have decent management. Have pride in your work and interactions with people. Believe it or not you’re building a brand of yourself and want it to be as effective as possible.

Now, this doesn’t mean slaving away and being treated like a doormat. Know your worth and be smart about what you produce. It’s important to not only be on the grind, but to give yourself credit for it as well. If you’ve created a new form or an effective way of doing things in your office, keep track of that as a kudos to yourself and update it on your resume. If the time comes for you to ask for a promotion or salary increase, you’ll have solid reasons for management to consider (if that doesn’t work out, there are other companies who just might appreciate your accomplishments!)


Getting caught up in office drama. Another big turn off for other co-workers and management is the office gossip. They can’t wait to spread the latest rumor (or start it) and get in everyone’s business. It’s unprofessional and makes you look unproductive and horrible at your job. It doesn’t matter if it’s a corporate setting, beauty salon or mechanical shop. Gossiping at the job starts nothing but trouble and at the end of the day does damage to your image. It shows that you have little to no work ethic and can’t be productive when needed. Plus, you’ll be surprised at how aware management is of office gossip, who started it and who keeps it going. The last thing you want is for them to see you that way or to categorize you as a gossip. It’s one thing to be aware of it and something else to be caught in the middle of it. Avoid those who come around to run their mouths. Don’t encourage conversation with them and make it clear that you’re not interested. Keep a low profile and stay productive!

Are you frustrated in your current job? Have you thought about your next move? Ask and share right here in the comments!

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Freelance Writing and Social Media

Source: Flickr, Rishi Bandopadhay
Source: Flickr, Rishi Bandopadhay

These past few months of blogging and freelancing have been very interesting for me. There’s tons of information out there which can be quite overwhelming. But over time I’ve learned to filter out information that’s actually useful. One topic that I’m constantly researching is writing and social media. What purpose can social media serve for my writing? How can the two actually connect? To be honest, I’m sort of old-fashioned when it comes to making connections, I’ve been very skeptical about relying on social media to promote my writing/brand.

The advantages

Besides being fast and seemingly convenient, social media can be an excellent avenue for promotion. Novelists, authors or more established writers can find success using the likes of Facebook or Twitter to promote their latest product. There are also pretty good websites out that that can be used as promotional platforms such as Amazon and Writer’s Digest. The choices are many and the possibilities could be great.

The cons

The thing is, using social media for writing purposes can be very hit or miss in my opinion. Quality vs. Quantity tends to come to mind when faced with the options of Facebook and Twitter. Sure, these avenues are successful for other areas such as personality promotion or music, but I personally think it clashes with the uniqueness of writing. Writing is a promotional tool within itself, so it makes little sense to use another promotional tool that’s based on social grounds, especially for the sake of numbers. If the material is good, it will get noticed and spread. It doesn’t matter how many followers you have or how many times you’re “tweeted”.  Blaise Lucey does a great job of breaking down the effectiveness of Facebook for authors. This information helped me a lot in making a reasonable decision for promoting my brand.

The verdict?


I’m not interested in numbers or a lot of tweets, so I will not be using social media as the main platform for my brand. It may change over time, but right now I’m not seeing it. Instead, I will use it in a well thought out way that will help promote my work and my services. Just a side note, I had a Facebook account for 5 years. In the beginning it was fun; I got to connect with old friends and family members. When all of that wore off, it became pretty pointless. Plus it seemed to become invasive of what I was doing, my likes and where I did my groceries. The whole thing became annoying so I decided to shut it down. I have been thinking of opening another account, but strictly for the use of New3Creation.  As my role as a writer continues to grow, it’s been easier for me to come up with a strategy that will be effective and cause me to stay in touch with my audience effectively. In the meantime, I’m keeping it “old school”. There are a few freelancing events going on in my area over the next couple of months. If you ask me, there’s nothing better than a meet and greet. I know good connections will be made in such a setting, and I’ll be sure to post my experience and share with you all once it happens. Stay tuned!

Writers, have you found social media to be beneficial for your work? If so, what specific sites are you using???

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Doing the Most

Recently I came to the realization that going above and beyond can have a serious backlash. A couple of years ago, the staffing in our office were cut short severely; mainly because of retirements. So I decided to step up to the plate and really prove myself as a worker and even a leader. Mind you I was already a productive worker and management was aware. I just wanted to take it to the next level. I went all out, attending meetings, staying late, volunteering to take projects no one else wanted to touch and so forth. Before I knew it, I became the go-to person of the office. Whatever management needed at the drop of a dime, they knew who to go to. I never failed to disappoint. As time went by this new go-to role grew. The work increased – everything increased….except for the pay. Naturally I started wondering when something would happen to compensate me for the hard work I was putting in. I eventually started asking questions and got round about answers. There was of course talk of budget constraints and hands being tied to do anything for me. After a while the lines started to get old. I had to face it – I had been hustled, bamboozled, played, you name it.

I was pissed.

But then I had to really analyze myself and the situation. Why did I work so hard? Why did I put in all those hours (no overtime pay by the way)? Why did I really volunteer for the projects? Well of course I was looking into advancing my career, so I took on more work to prove myself to management. You see, the “plan” was that they would recognize what I was doing, speak up for me and then I would get promoted. Yeah, it didn’t work out that way at all. So I was left completely exhausted, hardly motivated and extremely disappointed. Why couldn’t anyone look out for me? I wondered if all my hard work had gone in vain.

Flickr photos - Heather Kennedy
This is minutely how I felt after realizing I had been pimped.


Fortunately, new opportunities have opened up for me that include advance for me and my career (Yay!). So I am moving forward on good terms with lessons learned. The next time I go above and beyond, it will be for the right reasons because I am a mission-oriented person and I have to show that before any skill or project is displayed.

Questions still remain thought. I wonder why things played out the way they did. Is it because I had selfish purposes? Or was it just not meant to be?

I would love some insight!


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